Welcome to our project blog!

This is our blog where we hope to post regular updates on our project as we begin our research on the submerged landscape archaeology of Australia and beyond!

Submerged landscape archaeology is an under-researched field in Australia and represents a major opportunity to address knowledge gaps in world prehistory such as early human migrations, the archaeology of land bridges and coastal-hinterland cultural exchange.

Project Team and Partner Institutions

 

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Nearly one-third of Australia’s landmass was drowned after the last ice age and generations of people were displaced by sea-level change. This pioneering, multi-disciplinary study of submerged landscape archaeology in Australia is designed to investigate the records of the now-submerged Pilbara coast (spanning 50,000 to 7000 years ago). Information from drowned contexts will help address critical debates in Australian archaeology relating to past sea-level rise, population resilience, mobility, and diet. The project integrates cultural and environmental studies and contributes a unique southern hemisphere insight into world prehistory. Further, an adaptation of method from the world’s only confirmed submarine middens, in the Baltic Sea of modern Denmark, will contribute to broader questions of site submergence and preservation as well as cultural response to rising sea levels and shifting shorelines. A suite of cutting edge marine and aerial survey techniques will be developed to investigate physical and cultural submerged landscapes.

Author: Deep History of Sea Country: Climate, Sea Level and Culture

This is our official project blog for the Deep History of Sea Country: Climate, Sea Level and Culture. Our project is funded by the Australian Research Council (DP170100812) and our official webpage is: http://www.flinders.edu.au/ehl/archaeology/seacountry.cfm Submerged landscape archaeology is an under-researched field in Australia and represents a major opportunity to address knowledge gaps in world prehistory such as early human migrations, the archaeology of land bridges and coastal-hinterland cultural exchange.

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